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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >>> and there's something that's about to be big news concerning the fbi. that's coming up tonight in a big story that we've got ahead. it's right at the end of the show. you will not see it anywhere else. we've got a big hour ahead tonight. please stay with us. >>> oh, but first, "one more thing." on veto watch out of arizona. as we await word on whether or not arizona governor jan brewer will sign that state's discriminate against gay people it's okay with us bill, well tonight, delta air lines became the latest company to put out a statement condemning the legislation in arizona. delta air lines now joining americanairlines, southwest airlines, apple, intel, verizon, at&t, along with both of arizona's professional basketball teams, the nba's phoenix suns and the wnba's phoenix mercury. all of these organizations are now coming out publicly and saying please veto this bill. will governor jan brewer listen? veto watch continues. stay with us. we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ ♪ told ya you could do it. (dad vo) i want her to be safe. so, i taught her what i could and got her a subaru. (girl)
elected in 2010. in the year 2012 the fbi raided his house. the following day the fbi raided offices at trenton city hall. and in the fall of that year, cement 2012, honey fitz, aka napoleon, aka the little guy waurg arrested with eight other people including the mayor's own brother and the charge was corruption. the feds posed as developers and they offered the mayor a bribe in exchange for him ok'ing the development of a downtown parking garage in trenton. there was no actual planned garage and they were not real developers twaumpl a sting. the mayor said yes to the bribe. in february this month, he was convicted of all charges. he is due to be sentence in the may. and co-get decades in federal prison based on these charges and convictions. on the day he was convicted on february 7th, the associated press provided some helpful contacts for understanding how big of a deal it is for the mayor to be going to jail on federal corruption charges. the short answer is, it is not that big a deal at all. not for new jersey. since 2000, the mayors of newark, patterson, hoboken pass aching, as
home in harlem a few months before he died. >> you set on said on the record that you think the fbi may have given you cancer in a. >> almost certainly. extremely advanced and there's no question after the assassination of martin luther king, they themselves have had to change the method with what they consider to be leaders. and of course one of the best ways to do it. and they say jokingly that the 1600 the indians could catch smallpox and they could give us cancer with their laser beams today. and of course america is involved with a warfare. >> host: did the fbi watch stokely carmichael? >> guest: absolutely. very famously they have a counterintelligence program that has initially been started in the 1950s and is supposed to be anti-communist. and it quickly becomes something that is used to provide surveillance over civil rights activist and pro-democracy activists and black power revolutionaries and carmichael has an extensive fbi file. the state department, the united states intelligence services, the fbi is watching them all the time, especially for the black power speech of jun
lumumba on democracy now! the day after he was elected. i asked him about the fbi's decision last are to place his former client, assata shakur, on the most wanted terrorist list. but before we play that clip, i want to ask you about the media 'sverage, he chokwe lumumba election, and some who call the most revolutionary man in america -- mayor in america, and a lack of coverage. i was watching the networks last night and open the "new york times" paper edition today and i did not see a reference. for night watching msnbc hours. i did not watch every single second son may have missed something, but i did not see a reference. as bill chandler said, he died late yesterday afternoon. >> i saw something in "the times" this morning -- >> online, yes. >> chokwe is somebody you have to give this much time to really talk about. this is a man who lived, if you will, multiple journeys in his life. and he was quixotic to people because on the one hand, you could easily stereotype him as being some sort of radical -- he would say he was a radical because he did not see that as being a bad thi
could find those. also personal papers. also under surveillance. fbi, mississippi highway patrol, in the mississippi state sovereignty commission which was an organization with the express purpose how to preserve racial segregation so i had public-relations to present mississippi and a positive light to the tourist but also surveillance there was an informant on the march that was reporting back to the state of mississippi classified as informant tax. he/she produced very detailed reports what was going on in meetings from civil rights leaders in the middle of the controversy. that was complex. in those officials tended to exaggerated makeup stuff but it is important to understand the ways it was watched. the last major aspect was talking to the people in the march i interviewed 100 people who were in for -- involved with that brought this was not adjusted national story about political conflicts or ideas but physical participation of the marchers a coming of age the unique experience in for some tragic and disappointing to bring up the personal stories gave the extra layer. >> h
. >> shooting, fighting. >> yes. >> i want to be a criminal profiler for the fbi. the violence. that made me not even to want go to school. >> i want to be a prosecutor. it's sad you can't walk down the street. you have to pick and choose the right time to leave the house. >> just the other day, somebody tried to rob my brother with a gun at the gas station. >> it's stressful. that's the most overwhelming thing. >> reporter: the young men joined obama to launch my brother's keeper initiative, tying together the best mentoring programs and provide educational and economic opportunities to at-risk youth. for the president, this was clearly personal. >> when i was their age, i was a lot like them. i didn't have a dad in the house. and i was angry about it. i made bad choices. i got high without always thinking about the harm that it could do me. i didn't always take school as seriously as i should have. i made excuses. i could see myself in these young men. when i made a mistake, the consequences were not as severe. i had people who encouraged me. they never gave up on me. and so i didn't give
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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